1. Toucan Barbet / Semnornis ramphastinus

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
Is one of South America’s fanciest birds. Found only in western Colombia and western Ecuador, this colorful species is frugivorous and has a cooperative breeding system. The species shows a huge variety of color, with a pale, black-tipped stocky bill, blackish crown, pale blue throat and face, dull orange back and flanks, red bib, and dark blue-black wings and tail. 

3. Multicolored Tanager / Chlorochrysa nitidissima

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

The Colombian endemic and globally threatened Multicolored Tanager is a stunningly attractive bird. Males possess a yellow face and throat, a gleaming green nape, a black and chestnut patch on the neck, a yellow mantle and greenish-blue rump, green wings and tail, and bright blue underparts with black median breast and belly.

5. Sharp-tailed Ibis / Cercibis oxycerca

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Is a species found in seasonally flooded lowland wetlands in northern South America, where it can be found among several other species of dark ibis in Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and Brazil.  For an ibis, this species shows a rather unusual, elongated body shape with a particularly long tail extension.

7. Wire-tailed Manakin / Pipra filicauda

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

It is found upriver in the western Amazon Basin and the neighboring countries of northern Peru, eastern Ecuador and Colombia, and southern and western portions of Venezuela. Is natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps.

9. Orinoco Goose / Oressochen jubatus

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Currently considered Near Threatened by BirdLife International, the range of Orinoco Goose is still relatively widespread across much of eastern South America as far south as northern Argentina. Principally found in lowland areas, it occurs on beaches and oxbow lakes along forested rivers, as well as in wet savannas and around large freshwater wetlands. Orinoco Goose is an attractive bird, clad in pale grayish buff over the head and neck, with salmon red legs, a rufous belly and back, and mostly blackish wings relieved by a green-and-white patterned speculum. 

2. Vermilion Cardinal / Cardinalis phoeniceus

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Is the most shockingly red of the three species. The male is a bright rosy red and, as if it were not noticeable enough, it has a long spikelike crest which is almost always held straight up. It is a fairly common species in dry desert scrub and dense thorny thickets along the Caribbean coasts of Venezuela and Colombia.

4. Santa Marta Parakeet / Pyrrhura viridicata

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Is restricted to the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in northern Colombia. is mostly green, with orange and red underwing coverts, blue primaries, and a variable amount of red on the belly. Inhabits humid montane forest at 1800-2800 m. Although less common, it is also observed along forest borders and second growth woodland, and crossing over cleared and cultivated areas when flying between forest fragments.

6. White-eared Jacamar / Galbalcyrhynchus leucotis

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

The most striking plumage feature is the conspicuous white ear coverts-patch, and this immediately distinguishes the present species from its only congeneric. It inhabits lowland primary forest, both terra firme and seasonally flooded areas, and is usually easily observed due to its liking for clearings and other semi-open areas, often beside rivers and streams.

8. Northern Screamer / Chauna chavaria

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Is confined to the marshy lowlands of northern Colombia and extreme northwestern Venezuela. Like other screamers, it is a rather sedate bird generally observed singly, in pairs, or in small groups perched on bushes or trees within a marsh or forested swamp. It grazes for herbaceous growth, and builds a nest of aquatic vegetation in the middle of a marsh. The chicks leave the nest after only a few days of brooding.

10. Perija Thistletail / Asthenes perijana

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Is a rare furnariid with a highly restricted range in northern South America. It is found solely on Sierra de Perija on the border of Colombia and Venezuela between 3000 and 3400 meters in elevation. The species is olive brown above with a gray crown, gray superciliary, gray-brown underparts with an ochre chin, and a very long, spike-tipped tail.  Perija Thistletail is considered to be endangered by the IUCN Red List due to threats from human development of its habitat in the tiny range.